Is Open Source Big Data a broken promise?

By October 7, 2016Blog

An article caught my eye this past week, where Robert Hof of SiliconAngle asserted that the challenges of Apache Hadoop adoption are a byproduct of the open source development approach. Hof argues that the various pieces do not integrate well together and some projects are not living up to their promises, which has resulting in additional work being required by organizations for them to see their true value. This has lead to a small pool of available talent and end-customers that are uncertain about where to direct their investments.

On the heels of this article, I watched the below video from Rakesh Kant of US Bank that I found just as insightful.


His sentiment rings loud and clear:

  • “I’m not seeing any signal, only noise.”
  • “The landscape is evolving into more experiments”
  • “A standard is required to help businesses”
  • “I’d like to focus time on delivering business value”

The Hadoop ecosystem has always been a technology focused one, and its clear this technology has been ground breaking and impactful. However, I do think that, over time, this technology has evolved to solve the needs of technologists. Enterprises have been largely been left without a voice and to struggle to embrace it with confidence.

In my view, open source as a development model is not the problem. Rather, it’s the lack of feedback from end-users like US Bank into the process. ODPi would like to solve this problem and help end-users share their feedback.

If you are an end-user of Hadoop, we’d love to have you as part of our End User Advisory Board to discuss these issues and help us focus on making adopting these technologies less risky for you.